Unit 2 Weather, Climate, and the Water Cycle

TeacherBrittnee Zeak
Subject AreaScience
Grade Level5
Week #Sept 4th - Oct. 13th
Unit of InstructionWater Cycle, Weather and Climate
Standard(s) Taught

5th Grade Science Curriculum Map 

SC.5.E.7.1 – Create a model to explain the parts of the water cycle. Water can be a gas, a liquid, or a solid and can go back and forth from one state to another.

SC.5.E.7.2 – Recognize that the ocean is an integral part of the water cycle and is connected to all of Earth’s water reservoirs via evaporation and precipitation processes.

SC.5.E.7.3 – Recognize how air temperature, barometric pressure, humidity, wind speed and direction, and precipitation determine the weather in a particular place and time.

SC.5.E.7.4 – Distinguish among the various forms of precipitation (rain, snow, sleet, and hail), making connections to the weather in a particular place and time.

SC.5.E.7.5 – Recognize that some of the weather-related differences, such as temperature and humidity, are found among different environments, such as swamps, deserts, and mountains.

SC.5.E.7.6 – Describe characteristics (temperature and precipitation) of different climate zones as they relate to latitude, elevation, and proximity to bodies of water.

SC.5.E.7.7 – Design a family preparedness plan for natural disasters and identify the reasons for having such a plan.

 

Learning Targets and Learning Criteria

Students will: 

• review that water and the sun’s energy are renewable resources found on Earth.

• review how water changes its state through warming and cooling processes.

• create and label the parts of various 2- and 3-D models of the water cycle (evaporation, condensation, precipitation, runoff, collection).

• investigate the water cycle using various 3-D models.

• explain the changes that occur to water as it moves from one part of the water cycle to another (e.g., evaporation-liquid water changes to water vapor, condensation-water vapor changes to liquid water).

• describe the role of the sun in the water cycle (provides the heat energy required for evaporation).

• describe the role of the oceans in the water cycle (provides most of the water for the water cycle).

• explain that oceans are connected to all bodies of water on Earth via the evaporation and precipitation processes. 

• review measuring temperature using dual thermometers (Celsius and Fahrenheit).

• describe each of the components that determine the weather in a particular place and time (air temperature, air pressure, humidity, wind speed and direction, and precipitation).

• match weather data collection tools to the component of weather it measures (thermometer-air temperature, anemometer-wind speed, barometer-air pressure, wind vane-wind direction, rain gauge-precipitation, hygrometer-humidity).

• collect and record daily weather data using selected tools for the next two weeks.

• describe relationships that exist between components of weather:

• identify and describe how air temperature, air pressure, humidity, wind speed and direction, and precipitation determine the weather in a particular place.

• identify and describe how air temperature, air pressure, humidity, wind speed and direction, and precipitation varies at different times (season to season).

• identify cloud types (cumulus, cirrus, stratus, and cumulonimbus) and their relationship to weather (e.g., cumulonimbus clouds are associated with stormy weather).

• explain how different types of precipitation form (rain, snow, sleet, and hail).

• explain the conditions necessary for different types of precipitation to form (e.g. hail develops during strong thunderstorms).

• discuss relationships that exist among weather, location, and season (e.g., a strong thunderstorm may produce hail in Florida during spring and summer). 

• compare the weather conditions of different environments: desert, grassland, rainforest, tundra, wetland, swamps, and mountains (e.g., the weather over a desert is more likely to be dry and hot, and the weather over a swamp is more likely to be warm and rainy).

• identify the location of major climate zones (polar, tropical, and temperate) on a globe and on different maps.

• locate the equator (0 degrees latitude) and Florida on a globe and on different maps.

• distinguish between environments and climate zones (e.g. the tundra environment is located within the polar zone, the rainforest environment is within the tropical zone).

• describe air temperature and precipitation of different climate zones.

• describe how air temperature and precipitation relate to latitude (distance from equator) within a climate zone.

• describe how air temperature and precipitation relate to elevation (e.g., mountains and valleys) within a climate zone.

• describe how air temperature and precipitation relate to the proximity to bodies of water (e.g., coastal vs. inland, ocean currents) within a climate zone

• recognize that Florida’s temperate climate, proximity to the ocean, and geography make it vulnerable to a number of potential natural disaster threats (e.g., hurricanes, tropical storms, tornadoes, wildfires, flooding).

• design a family preparedness plan for natural disasters.

• identify the reasons for having family preparedness plans. 

Classroom Activities

CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES

  • Interactive Science Journal 
  • Student Reading Guided Activities
  • Inquiry Hands On 
    1. Watching Water Cycle
    2. What Happens Duing the Water Cycle 
    3. Make a Model Tornado
    4. Natures Weather Logs
  • Water Cycle Poster
  • Meteorologist
  • Severe Weather Preparedness Plan 
Assignments Due
  1. Vocabulary Choice Board Week 1
  2. Vocabulary Quiz Week 1
  3. Vocabulary Choice Board Week 2 
  4. Vocabulary Quiz Week 2
  5. Unit 3 Test Wednesday Oct 11th 
  6.  Severe Weather Project Due October 13th Friday
Additional Resources