Quarter Four: Week #33rd April 9th-13th Lesson Plans (Math/Science/S. Studies Homeroom Only)

TeacherMichael Lee
Subject AreaMath/Science/S. Studies
Grade Level4th Grade
Week #Week #33rd April 9th-13th Lesson Plans
Unit of InstructionRecognizing and analyzing attributes of 2-dimensional shapes /Mathapalooza (Word Problems)/Seasonal Changes and Food Chains/Florida Territory
Standard(s) Taught

Math: 4.OA.3.5, 4.MD.3.7, 4.G.1.1, 4.G.1.2, 4.G.1.3

 

1.     Generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given rule. Identify apparent features of the pattern that were not explicit in the rule itself. For example, given the rule “Add 3” and the starting number 1, generate terms in the resulting sequence and observe that the terms appear to alternate between odd and even numbers. Explain informally why the numbers will continue to alternate in this way.

 

 

2.     Recognize angle measure as additive. When an angle is decomposed into non-overlapping parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts. Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram in real world and mathematical problems, e.g., by using an equation with a symbol for the unknown angle measure.

3.     Draw points, lines, line segments, rays, angles (right, acute, obtuse), and perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify these in two-dimensional figures.

 

     

4.     Classify two-dimensional figures based on the presence or absence of parallel or perpendicular lines, or the presence or absence of angles of a specified size. Recognize right triangles as a category, and identify right triangles.

5.     Recognize a line of symmetry for a two-dimensional figure as a line across the figure such that the figure can be folded along the line into matching parts. Identify line-symmetric figures and draw lines of symmetry.

 

Science: SC.4.L.17.1, SC.4.L.17.2, SC.4.L.17.3

1.     Compare the seasonal changes in Florida plants and animals to those in other regions of the country.

2.     Explain that animals, including humans, cannot make their own food and that when animals eat plants or other animals, the energy stored in the food source is passed to them.

3.     Trace the flow of energy from the Sun as it is transferred along the food chain through the producers to the consumers.

Learning Targets and Learning Criteria

Math:

  • Generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given one- or two-step rule.

 

  • Identify features in number or shape patterns after following a given one- or two-step rule.

 

E.g, The pattern repeats every five steps and goes in this order, circle, hexagon, right triangle, square, square. Can you draw the

next four shapes in the pattern?

 

Can you tell what the 51st shape in the pattern will be without drawing all of the shapes? How did you determine what the 51st shape would be?

 

“The pattern is circle, hexagon, right triangle, square, square, and the pattern repeats every five numbers. I looked at 50 and knew the 50th shape would be a square, so the 51st shape will begin the pattern again and it is a circle.”

 

  • Recognize angle measure as additive, explaining that the angle measurement of a larger angle is the sum of the angle measures of its decomposed parts.

 

  • Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram in real world and mathematical problems.

 

  • Draw points, lines, line segments, rays, right angles (exactly 90 degrees), acute angles (less than 90 degrees), obtuse angles (greater than 90 degrees and less than 180 degrees), and perpendicular and parallel lines.

 

 

E.g., List the two-dimensional attributes within this trapezoid:

  • Identify the two-dimensional attributes shown above in two-dimensional shapes.

NOTE: Students can and should make geometric distinctions about angles without measuring or mentioning degrees. Angles should be classified in comparison to right angles, such as greater than (obtuse) or less than (acute) a right angle.

  • Classify two-dimensional shapes into the following categories: those with parallel lines, those with perpendicular lines, those with both parallel and perpendicular lines, those with no parallel or perpendicular lines.
  • Classify two-dimensional shapes into categories based on the presence or absence of acute, obtuse, or right angles.
  • Recognize that right triangles form a category of triangles and identify triangles that fit in this category.

E.g., Do you agree with the label on each of the ovals in the Venn diagram? Why or why not? Explain why some shapes fall in the overlapping sections of the ovals.

 

  • Explain line symmetry and identify figures that have line symmetry (e.g., fold a figure or draw a line so it has two parts that match exactly).
  • Draw lines of symmetry in both regular and non-regular polygons.

 

NOTE: This standard only includes line symmetry, NOT rotational symmetry.

Science:

  1. Compare ecosystems in Florida to ones found in other regions of the country (e.g., deciduous forest, ocean, grassland, wetland).

 

  1. Discuss environmental and biological triggers that initiate an organism’s response to seasonal change both in Florida and in different regions of the country (e.g., temperature, precipitation, dormancy, molting, breeding, camouflaging).

 

  1. Differentiate the seasonal changes of Florida plants to those in other regions of the country (e.g., dormancy, leaves changing color and falling off, flowering season).

 

  1. Differentiate the seasonal changes of Florida animals to those in other regions of the country (e.g., color change, body covering change, hibernation, migration, camouflage).

 

  1. Review that all living things need energy to survive.

 

 

  1. Explain that plants make their own food (photosynthesis) and are called producers.

 

  1. Explain that animals, including humans, cannot make their own food and are called consumers.

 

 

  1. Explain that when animals eat plants or other animals, the energy stored in the food source is passed to them.

 

  1. Describe that all life on Earth is dependent upon the sun.
  • Trace the flow of energy from the sun as it is transferred along the food chain through the producers to the consumers (e.g., sun à grass à rabbit -àfox).
  • Explain that some energy is lost from one organism to the next in the form of heat.
  • Classify consumers as herbivores, carnivores, or omnivores.
  • Describe the relationship between plants as producers and animals as consumers.
Classroom Activities

Math Centers (Math Games, App “Media” Resources, Teacher Time, Hands-On Activities)

Multiplication Facts timed test

Splash Math

 

Number Spiral Circle Project

What’s your Angle, Pythagoras? Book

Mathapalooza (Word Problems)

Study Jams: Food Chains

Magic School Bus: Get Eaten (Food Chain)

 

Assignments Due

 

Math IXL Codes this week: (none)

Math Weekly Homework Q4: Week 3 Line Plots Problem Solving

 

Polygon Riddle worksheet and Line Masterpiece worksheet

Science Fusion Unit 10: Lesson #3 and #4 book work and quizzes

Social Studies Weekly: Florida Territory

Additional Resources