Quarter 2 Week 2 October 21-15, 2001

TeacherMelissa Forney
Subject AreaELA/Reading
Grade Level7
Week #11
Unit of InstructionOral Book Reports, Essay Writing, Spelling and Vocabulary
Standard(s) Taught

LAFS.7.SL.1.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in
groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and
issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under
study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the
topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, track progress toward specific goals
and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.
c. Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others’ questions
and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the
discussion back on topic as needed.
d. Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted,
modify their own views.LAFS.7.SL.1.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in
groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and
issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under
study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the
topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, track progress toward specific goals
and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.
c. Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others’ questions
and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the
discussion back on topic as needed.
d. Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted,
modify their own views.

LAFS.7.SL.2.4 Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent
manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use
appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
Cognitive Complexity: Level 2: Basic Application of Skills & Concepts

LAFS.7.L.1.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and
usage when writing or speaking.
a. Explain the function of phrases and clauses in general and their function in
specific sentences.
b. Choose among simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex
sentences to signal differing relationships among ideas.
c. Place phrases and clauses within a sentence, recognizing and correcting
misplaced and dangling modifiers.

LAFS.7.L.3.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words
and phrases based on grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a
range of strategies.
a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a
word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a
word or phrase.
b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues
to the meaning of a word (e.g., belligerent, bellicose, rebel).
c. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries,
glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation
of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.
d. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase
(e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).
Cognitive Complexity: Level 2: Basic Application of Skills & Concepts
LAFS.7.L.3.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and
nuances in word meanings.
a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., literary, biblical, and mythological
allusions) in context.
b. Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonym/antonym,
analogy) to better understand each of the words.
c. Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar
denotations (definitions) (e.g., refined, respectful, polite, diplomatic,
condescending).
Cognitive Complexity: Level 3: Strategic Thinking & Complex Reasoning
LAFS.7.L.3.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domainspecific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word phrase

Learning Targets and Learning Criteria

My students will informally present oral book reports. 

My students will write a persuasive essay about The Lost Boys of Sudan.

My students will listen to the oral book reports and ask cogent questions.

My students will continue to read Submerged as a group if time permits. 

My students will learn spelling and vocabulary, including 9 Greek root words.

Classroom Activities

Monday – First Book Report. We will listen to each other’s book report and ask questions. Review Persuasive and Argumentative writing. There will be a summative test on Friday on Persuasive and Argumentative writing. Read aloud: Submerged if time permits.
Homework: Work on essay about The Lost Boys of Sudan. Tomorrow we will review your first two paragraphs.

Parent Signature________________________________________

Tuesday – Book Reports. We will listen to each other’s book report and ask questions. Check first two paragraphs of your essays. This will count as a quiz grade. Read Submerged. Review persuasive and argumentative writing.
Homework – Write paragraphs three and four on essay about The Lost Boys of Sudan. Tomorrow we will review your writing.

Parent Signature_______________________________________

Wednesday – Some kids will report to work on reading/writing skills with Mrs. Cornelius.
Independent Reading. Work on The Lost Boys Essays
NO HOMEWORK

Thursday – Finish paragraph five and six on essays about The Lost Boys of Sudan.
Homework – Finish essays and study notes on Persuasive and Argumentative writing.

Parent Signature______________________________________

Friday -Test on Persuasive and Argumentative writing. Turn in essays on The Lost Boys of Sudan.

Parents,
Thank you for letting me be your student’s teacher. The kids are lovely. I must commend you on their manners and thoughtfulness. In addition to their weekly work, I am teaching them to be live-long readers and citizens of the world. Thank you to parents who have sent in money. We can always use small individual bottles of water, juice, healthy snacks, paper towels, etc.
Have a great week!
Dr. Melissa Forney

Assignments Due

The Lost Boys of Sudan by The International Rescue Committee

In 1987, civil war drove an estimated 20,000 young boys from their families and villages in southern Sudan. Most just six or seven years old, they fled to Ethiopia to escape death or induction into the northern army. They walked more than a thousand miles, half of them dying before reaching Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya. The survivors of this tragic exodus became known as the Lost Boys of Sudan.

In 2001, close to four thousand Lost Boys came to the United States seeking peace, freedom and education. The International Rescue Committee helped hundreds of them to start new lives in cities across the country.

The outbreak of civil war in Sudan in 1983 brought with it circumstances that would permanently alter the lives of thousands of Sudanese boys and young men. As forces of the government of northern Sudan resumed its campaign against the Sudanese People’s Liberation Army (SPLA), the southern-based rebel group began inducting boys into the movement.

In the next few years, an estimated 20,000 Sudanese children fled their homeland in search of safety in what turned out to be a treacherous 1,000-mile journey to Ethiopia.

Wandering in and out of war zones, these “Lost Boys” spent the next four years in dire conditions. Thousands of boys lost their lives to hunger, dehydration, and exhaustion. Some were attacked and killed by wild animals; others drowned crossing rivers and many were caught in the crossfire of fighting forces.

Kakuma refugee camp

In 1991, war in Ethiopia sent the young refugees fleeing again and approximately a year later they began trickling into northern Kenya. Some 10,000 boys, between the ages of eight and 18, eventually made it to the Kakuma refugee camp—a sprawling, parched settlement of mud huts where they would live for the next eight years under the care of refugee relief organizations like the IRC.

The IRC began working in Kakuma in 1992 to assist the Lost Boys and other refugees fleeing the fighting in Sudan. Its programs expanded over time to include all of the camp’s health services: treating refugees who arrived malnourished or sick, offering rehabilitation programs for those who were disabled, and working to prevent outbreaks of disease.

Older boys took part in IRC education programs, and received support to learn trades and start small businesses to earn money to supplement relief rations. The IRC also helped these young entrepreneurs start savings accounts and access small loans to invest in their futures.

“The IRC’s health, sanitation, community services and education programs touched, in one way or another, the lives of all the Lost Boys who were in Kakuma and who were eventually resettled in the U.S.A.,” recalled Jason Phillips, who managed IRC programs in the camp from 2000 to 2001. “We accompanied and supported them throughout a large part of their journey.”

A refuge in the United States

As the war in Sudan continued to rage, the United Nations refugee agency (UNHCR) determined that repatriation and family reunification was no longer an option for the Lost Boys. UNHCR recommended approximately 3,600 of them for resettlement in the United States and the U.S. State Department concurred.

The Kakuma youth began arriving in the U.S. in small groups in the fall of 2000. Over the next year the IRC helped hundreds resettle in and around Atlanta, Boston, DallasPhoenixSalt Lake CitySan DiegoSeattle and Tucson.

Because many of the newly arrived Lost Boys were over 18 and considered adults, they were not placed into foster care. “We place the older boys together in apartments to try to maintain the kind of support network that they developed throughout their difficult journey and while living in the Kakuma camp,” said Jon Merrill, who was then director of the IRC’s resettlement program in Tucson. “They have been like family to each other for so long now, so it’s best for them to continue to live as a family unit here.”

Name_________________________________Date_______________Period______

 

What’s the Primary Difference Between Argumentative and Persuasive?

Let’s get to the nuts and bolts to this dilemma. When you are faced with persuasive writing you’re dealing with emotion. You are trying to influence or change another person’s mind with your words. The writer tries to make the reader feel better about them by agreeing to the cause. For instance, an ad of a sweet puppy with the title, “How much do you love me?”, or an ad asking “Hands up who wants our kids to live longer?”

An argumentative writing approach is more formal and academic. The writer has to back up his or her argument with hard evidence. This is what persuasive writing is lacking since it’s all about making the reader feel the heartfelt emotion or the writer’s well-defended opinion. Argumentative writing has to dig a little deeper and refer to scientific studies and quotes from experts.

What’s an Argumentative Essay?

When you start your argumentative essay, you have to make sure you’ve got your facts straight. That means, and yes I know, more work. Because the writer has to research and perhaps gather figures and facts before the actual writing process. Once that’s out of the way, you have to approach this style of writing as an attempt to convince the reader that the writer’s idea is true. This type of writing is basically a debate typed out on paper. As you get into an argumentative essay, you have to be aware of the pros and cons of the argument. The only instance when you can place an opinion under suspicion is when you have proof.

What’s a Persuasive Essay?

In persuasive writing facts and figures are thrown out the window and the writer has to convince the reader of his or her beliefs just with the use of his or her own words. For the sake of lack of facts, the writer has to come up with their own ideas and opinions that can stir up emotion in the reader so much so that they agree with the writer’s opinion.

Therefore, as a persuasive writer you are dealing with a reader’s emotions rather than minds, so knowing your audience is crucial. What would influence a group of teenagers, isn’t going to work successfully for a group of pensioners. Phrases in the First Person Narration and Second Person Narration such as, `In my opinion’,` I believe’, are usually used.

Both types of essays have their challenges that you have to keep in mind. Some students may feel that a little research before writing up a lengthy essay is easier than trying to know what your audience wants to read. Or vice versa. In any case, it’s good to know the difference between an argumentative and persuasive essay before you bite the bullet, get in front of your keyboard to buckle down and write.

In Conclusion

As discussed before, argumentative essays are a genre of writing that attempts to convince the readers to accept the writer’s idea as true, by using statistics, facts and figures, etc. while persuasive essays are a genre of writing that attempts to convince the readers to agree with the writer, by using emotions, personal ideas, etc.

 

Additional Resources

Book Reports are DUE on Monday, October 21. You have had one month to work on them. 🙂