ELA – April 2-6 & April 9-13, 2018

TeacherHeather Baker
Subject AreaEnglish Language Arts
Grade Level7
Week #Q4 - Weeks 3 & 4
Unit of InstructionFSA Reading Practice Test & Review
Standard(s) Taught

LAFS.7.RL.1.1 :Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

LAFS.7.RL.4.10 :By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
 
LAFS.7.RI.2.5 :Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas.
 
LAFS.7.L.3.4 : Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
  1. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
  2. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., belligerent, bellicose, rebel).
  3. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.
  4. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

    LAFS.7.RI.3.8 :Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

     

    LAFS.7.SL.1.3 :Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

    LAFS.7.RI.1.3 :Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

LAFS.7.RI.1.2 :Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

LAFS.7.L.1.1 :Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

  1. Explain the function of phrases and clauses in general and their function in specific sentences.
  2. Choose among simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal differing relationships among ideas.
  3. Place phrases and clauses within a sentence, recognizing and correcting misplaced and dangling modifiers.

    LAFS.7.RL.2.6 :Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text.

LAFS.7.RL.1.2 :Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

LAFS.7.L.3.5 :Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

  1. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., literary, biblical, and mythological allusions) in context.
  2. Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonym/antonym, analogy) to better understand each of the words.
  3. Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions) (e.g., refined, respectful, polite, diplomatic, condescending).
Learning Targets and Learning Criteria

 – Students will cite several pieces of textual evidence.
 – Students will analyze the structure an author used to organize a text.
 – Students will determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases.
 – Students will analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.
 – Students will determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text.
 – Students will analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text.
  – Students will determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.
 – Students will demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. 

Classroom Activities

April 2-6:  

“The Last Leaf” — Making Inferences: In this interactive tutorial, you’ll read the short story, “The Last Leaf,” by O. Henry to learn how to make inferences based on explicit and implicit information and your own reasoning.

Addicted To Lotteries: An Analysis Of Text… :  Learn about text structures found in informational texts by reading an article about lotteries.

Analyzing Word Parts: Follow the Signs :  Find the meanings of unfamiliar words by analyzing their word parts, like roots and prefixes. In this interactive tutorial, you’ll see how these “signs” will guide you in your reading.

Arguing Mars :  Learn how to identify explicit evidence and understand implicit meaning in a text. In this tutorial, you will learn how to identify a speakers argument or claim. 

Capitalization: A Crash Course:  Learn the rules of capitalization! By the end, you’ll have undergone a “crash course” in correct capitalization.

April 9-13:

Different Perspectives:  In this interactive tutorial, you’ll read an original short story about a car crash to analyze the points of view of the different characters in the story: are they objective or subjective?

Finding Buried Treasure:  Learn how to read several short stories about pirates and treasure in order to learn how to summarize a story, identify its theme, and tell the difference between the two.

Food For Thought: Analyzing Authors’… :  Discover how different authors can approach the same topic in very different ways. You will learn how to analyze an author’s approach based on the central idea of the text.

Frederick Douglass: The Art of Interaction:  In this interactive tutorial, you’ll read an excerpt from the famous autobiography The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass and analyze the interactions between individuals, ideas, and events.

Game On: Finding the Central Idea:  Select a character and learn to identify and explain the central idea within a text. In this interactive tutorial, you’ll analyze an article about video games to find the central idea.

Go Figure: Learning Figurative Language: Learn how figures of speech like simile, metaphor, and personification are used in the speeches of famous individuals like John F. Kennedy, Barack Obama, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Vocabulary in Action:  Learn 12 new academic vocabulary terms in this interactive tutorial! You’ll practice the words’ synonyms, antonyms, parts of speech, and context clues in order to add them to your vocabulary.

Assignments Due

Monday, April 2 – Spelling Test/Spelling Homework Due
Wednesday, April 4 – Poetry Packet & Poetry Project
Reading Packet – Chapters 1 & 2 of the Outsiders  (Vocabulary & Comprehension Questions.)
Friday, April 6 – ThinkCERCA  Central Ideas

Monday, April 9 – Spelling Test/Spelling Homework Due
Friday, April 13 – ThinkCERCA  Context Clues

Additional Resources

Commonly Misspelled/Misused Middle School Words

Week 11:  April 2                                                                     Week 12:  April 9
Lightning                                                                                  Collage
Miniature                                                                                  Violence
Occasionally                                                                             Sincerely
Principle                                                                                   Address
Questionnaire                                                                           Build
Referred                                                                                    Doubt
Rhyme                                                                                       Enough
Sergeant                                                                                     Lose
Twelfth                                                                                      Roommate
Except                                                                                       Eight