Q1 W6 10/5 – 10/9

TeacherLori Proctor
Subject AreaMath and Science
Grade Level4th
Week #Q1 W6 10/5 - 10/9
Unit of InstructionMath and Science
Standard(s) Taught

Math 4.OA2.4
Find all factor pairs for a whole number in range from 1-100
Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors
Determine whether a given whole number in the range of 1- 100 is a multiple of a given one digit number
Determine whether a given whole number is prime or composite

Science SC4E 5.2 SC4E 5.1
Describe the changes in the observable shape of the moon over the course of about a month
Predict the changes in the observable shape of the moon starting at any point in the cycle
Sequence moon patterns
Compare observable shapes of the moon
Explain that the moon’s physical shape does not actually change
Explain that Earth’s rotation on its axis causes the moon to appear as though it is moves across the sky in the day or night sky
Observe that the patterns of stars in the sky stay the same although they appear to shift across the sky nightly, and different stars can be seen in different seasons

Learning Targets and Learning Criteria

Students will be able to:
Determine factor pairs of a whole number
Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors
Determine whether a given number is a multiple of another number
Determine if a number in the range of 1-100 is prime or composite

Any whole number is a multiple of its factors: For example 21 is a multiple of 3 and a multiple of 7 because 21 = 3 x 7

A Prime number has only 1 and itself as factors: For example 5 is a prime number because only 5 x 1
A Composite number has 2 or more factor pairs: For example 9 is composite because 9 x 1 and 3 x 3

Predict the changes in the observable shape of the moon starting at any point in the cycle
Sequence moon patterns
Compare observable shapes of the moon
Explain that the moon’s physical shape does not actually change
Explain that Earth’s rotation on its axis causes the moon to appear as though it is moves across the sky in the day or night sky
Demonstrate that the star patterns (constellations) in the sky appear to shift across the sky nightly due to Earth’s rotation
Discuss how different star patterns are high in the night sky in some seasons but dip below the horizon in other seasons (e.g., use models/ simulations of winter and summer skyline)

Classroom Activities

Coloring Prime and Composite
Popcorn game with prime numbers
Ch 8 lesson 1
Ch 8 lesson 2
Math Topic Test 2 on addition and subtraction of multi digits numbers

Generation Genius
Oreo Lab
Science Topic Test
Quiz on Rotation/Revolution/Constellations

Assignments Due
Additional Resources