Week 6 Quarter 1 October 5 – 9, 2020

TeacherMelissa Forney
Subject AreaELA/Reading
Grade Level7
Week #6
Unit of Instructioncomprehending nonfiction details, writing introduction, middle, and conclusion
Standard(s) Taught

LAFS.7.RI.1.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Level 2

LAFS.7.RI.1.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective Level 2 summary of the text.         

LAFS.7.RI.1.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how Level 2 individuals influence ideas or events).

LAFS.7.RI.2.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings;Level 2 analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

LAFS.7.RI.2.5 Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text,including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the Level 2 development of the ideas.

LAFS.7.RI.2.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of Level 3 others.

Learning Targets and Learning Criteria

My students will read nonfiction articles and watch videos about Derek Paravicini and be able to point out important details.

My students will learn how to cite the author of the article or video in their own work.

My students will learn introductions and conclusions.

My students will review and prove they known this information.

Classroom Activities

Monday – We will finish reading our essays aloud. We will read a nonfiction text from Collections: “Finding Your Everest.”

https://my.hrw.com/content/hmof/language_arts/hmhcollections/fl/gr7/ese_9780544088283_/index.html

Watch the video about Derek Paravicini. Then read the two articles below about Derek Paravicini and take notes.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1191163/Derek-Paravicini-blind-severely-disabled-master-song-hearing–What-secret.html

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/entertainment-arts-15086761

Tuesday – Discuss information and show your notes about Derek Paravicini. Learn how to group and cite article authors.

Wednesday – Work on Edgenuity, Read independently on chapter books. Read “Finding Your Everest” at https://my.hrw.com/content/hmof/language_arts/hmhcollections/fl/gr7/ese_9780544088283_/index.html

Thursday – Work on essay about Derek Paravicini.

Friday – Work on Derek Paravicini, Kahoot.

Assignments Due

Students will read and take notes on the articles about Derek Paravicini.

Students will participate with the teacher on all material.

Students will write a nonfiction essay about Derek Paravicini, using proper cites, quotes, and paraphrases.

Accomodations:

ESE – Special Considerations based on IEP
504– Special Considerations based on Accommodation Plan
ESOL – Appropriate printed material, pre-teaching activities, various instructional approaches, student engagement and thinking activities, differentiation, check for content comprehension, resources for assistance, reinforce study skills, linguistic modifications, specific vocabulary, alternative assessment.

Additional Resources

1. according to the author – Use when citing from an author.
I wanted to visit Puerto Rico in the summer, but according to Juana Rios, “Be sure to visit Puerto Rico
in the spring.”

According to Juana Rios, it’s best to visit Puerto Rico in the springtime.

2. according to _______________ – Use when citing from an expert.
My dad planted tomato plants, and according to HGTV, “Tomatos grow quite well in South Carolina.”

According to HGTV, tomatoes grow well in South Carolina, and my dad planted some for us this year.

3. admits – Use when the expert has been questioned.
When asked about her experience in Panama, Caroline Ezra admits, “The whole experience was magical.”

Caroline Ezra admits her experience in Panama was simply magical.

4. advocates the view – Use when an expert recommends something.
Most schools want to keep a rigid schedule, but Melissa Forney advocates the view, “Children should have some free time to use their imaginations, to play, and to explore.”

Melissa Forney advocates that children should have time to use their imaginations, play, and explore even
though most schools want to keep a rigid schedule.

5. affirms – Use when an expert agrees with someone or something.
The author affirms, “I agree with Coach Simon that sports are a wonderful way for kids to get exercise.”

The author affirms that sports are a wonderful way for kids to get exercise.

6. agrees – Use when an expert agrees with someone or something.
Our principal agrees, “I’m going to schedule more time for P. E. because I believe that it’s good for students.”
Our principal agrees that we need more time on the schedule for P. E. because it’s good for us.

7. alleges – Use when an expert states something that he believes to be true.
My mother alleges, “If you’re nice to others, they’ll be nice to you.”

My mother alleges that other people will be nice to you if you’re nice to them.

8. argues – Use when an expert has an opposing or different view.
Most parents think kids should go to bed early, but my Dad argues, “Every child is different. Some kids
don’t need to go to bed early.”

When other parents think kids should go to be early, my Dad argues, “No way.” He thinks some kids don’t need to go to bed early.

9. asserts – Use when an expert makes a statement.
My teacher, Miss Phillips, asserts, “I want my students to know that reading is one of the most important skills we learn all year.”

Miss Phillips, my teacher, asserts that she wants her students to know that reading is incredibly
important, one of the most important skills we learn all year.

10. believes – Use when an expert states something he believes in.
Monty Roberts, The Horse Whisperer, believes, “Horses use a special language. Humans can learn this horse language and use it to communicate with horses.”

Monty Roberts, sometimes called the Horse Whisperer, believes horses use a special language and humans can learn this language and use it to talk with horses.

11. cautions – Use when an expert warns us.
Delmar Whitehorse cautions, “Never go out into the woods by yourself. Make sure you have someone with you and take plenty of water.”

When we go out into the woods, Delmar Whitehorse cautions us to always have someone with us and to take lots of water.

12. charges – Use when an expert asks us to do something.
The Golden Rule charges, “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”

The Golden Rule charges we should treat others like we want to be treated.

13. claims – Use when an expert states something to be true.
The alligator expert who took us out on the lake claims, “There are about 150,000 alligators here in Lake Jessup.”

When we went out on Lake Jessup with an alligator expert, he claimed there’s somewhere around 150,000
alligators in that lake.

14. comments – Use when an expert gives his opinion.
The makeup artist Janna Ripley comments, “Using less blush on your cheeks looks better than too much.”

Janna Ripley, a makeup artist, commented that she thinks it’s best not to use too much blush on
your cheeks.

15. compares – Use when an expert compares two things or two or more ideas.
The author compares, “When you own your own horse, it’s like a full-time hobby.”

The author compares owning your own horse to a full-time hobby.

16. concludes – Use for a last quote from an author or expert.
Della Sharps, veterinarian at Stelthorn Zoo, concludes, “The reason most zoo accidents happen is when some of our guests break the rules. These animals are wild. Never forget that.”

The veterinarian at Stelthorn Zoo, Della Sharps, concludes that if some guest didn’t break the rules, most zoo accidents wouldn’t happen. These animals are wild, and we must remember that.

17. confides – Use when an expert or author shares confidential information.
The author confides, “I was shy as a kid, too, and could hardly speak to a girl.”

The author confides that he could hardly speak to a girl when he was a kid because he was shy.

18. confirms – Use when an expert agrees with something previously stated or another expert.
In the second article, Dr. Granger confirms Dr. Salk’s findings. “If we are not watchful, polio could once again become a threat.”

Dr. Granger warns that polio could once again become a threat if we are not watchful, which confirms Dr. Salk’s findings.

19. counsels – Use when an expert gives advice.
In his article on dental care, Dr. Lee Edgars counsels, “Eating an apple every day does wonders for your teeth.”

In his article on dental care, Dr. Lee Edgars counsels us to eat an apple every day because it’s good for your teeth.

20. declares – Use to quote an expert.
The weather report from Channel 7 declares, “We’re under a tornado watch until 3:00 pm.”

Channel 7’s weather report declares we are under a tornado watch until 3:00 pm.

21. demands – Use to show the expert was forceful in his beliefs.
The author demands, “Don’t get a dog if you’re not willing to treat it with love and kindness.”

The author demands for us to either treat our pet dogs with love and kindness or don’t get one.

22. denies – Use when an expert wants us to know that a previous claim is not true.
The author denies the claim that he never served in the military. “I served two tours in Iraq and
one in Afghanistan.”

The author served two tours in Iraq and one in Afghanistan. He denies any claims that he never
served in the military.

23. emphasizes – Use when an expert wants to really make a point.
The second author emphasizes, “Make sure your eggs and butter are at room temperature.”

The second author emphasizes to make sure the eggs and butter you use are at room temperature.

24. establishes – Use to quote an expert.
The author establishes, “Parkour is not for everyone. You must be in the best physical shape.”

The author establishes that you must be in the best physical shape to participate in Parkour.

25. estimates – Use when an expert is giving an educated guess.
In the third article, the author estimates, “At least 75% of adults will be overweight by 50.”

The author of the third article estimates that by the age of 50, at least 75% of adults will be overweight.

26. explains – Use when an expert gives expository information.
Model Angela Townsend explains, “Modeling pays a lot, but it’s a very demanding job.”

Model Angela Townsend explains that modeling is a very demanding job, but it pays well.

27. expresses – Use when an expert is giving his opinion or feelings.
Omar Trujillo expresses, “Working with butterflies may seem strange to some, but for me it’s a life’s calling.”

Omar Trujillo expresses that working with butterflies is a life’s calling even if some people think it’s weird.

28. feels – Use when an expert shares his feelings.
The author feels, “When you’re deaf, it’s nice when hearing people include you in the conversation. We have thoughts and opinions just like everyone else.”

The author feels that it’s good for hearing people to include deaf people in their conversations
because being deaf doesn’t mean you don’t have thoughts, feelings, and opinions.

29. states – Use to quote an expert.
When she was questioned by the police, the suspect’s wife stated, “He was never violent before.”

When the police questioned her, the suspect’s wife stated she had never seen her husband use
violence before.

30. holds the position – Use when an expert is on one side of a debate.
Jackson Torres, world-famous makeup artist, holds the position, “The creepy makeup is what a horror movie needs to be successful with the audience.”

Jackson Torres holds the position that a horror movie audience wants to see really creepy makeup. He should know because he’s a world-famous makeup artist.

31. identifies – Use when an expert points out a specific example.
The author identifies with the poor. “I know what it’s like to go to bed hungry.”

The author identifies with those who are poor and have gone to bed hungry.

32. illustrates – Use when an expert tells a story to make a point.
Debbie Johnson illustrates how important it is to stay off your phone when you drive. “Two years ago I answered a text while I was driving. When I looked up, it was too late. I smashed into the car in front of me. The driver was killed, and I lost my leg.”

Debbie Johnson illustrates that is important to stay off your phone when you drive. She answered a text while driving two years ago and had a car wreck. The other driver was killed and Debbie lost her leg.

33. implies – Use when an expert suggests something but might not state it outright.
The baker at Dunkin’ Donuts implies, “One look at me and my size will tell you what I do
for a living.”

The baker at Dunkin’ Donuts implies that he is overweight because he eats some of the goodies
he makes every day.

34. indicates – Use to quote an expert.
The author’s research indicates, “The AIDS problem in Africa has not been solved. A high percentage of men, women, and children still have AIDS and need our help.”

The author’s research indicates that many African men, women, and children still have AIDS and need our help.

35. insists – Use when an expert really wants to make a point.
Dominique Gentry, the author of the second article, insists, “Pit bulls are not violent by nature. They are loving, gentle dogs. Dog fighters abuse them, starve them, and turn them into killers.”

The author of the second article, Dominique Gentry, insists that pit bulls are loving, gentle dogs. It is only when dog fighters beat and starve them that they turn into killers.

36. instructs – Use when an expert teaches us or gives directions.
Our baking teacher instructs, “Too much beating toughens muffins. Lightly stir your dough.”

Our baking teacher instructs us to lightly stir our muffin dough, so it won’t get tough.

37. maintains – Use when an expert tells his side of the story.
The first author disagrees, but the author of the second article maintains, “We need some sun every single day. We get Vitamin D through exposure to the sun.”

The second author maintains that we need sun every day because that’s one way we get    Vitamin D.

38. mentions – Use when an expert is casual in his opinion.
The author mentions, “I would secretly love to be chosen for the space program.”

The author mentioned that she would be thrilled to be chosen for the space program.

39. notes – Use when an expert makes an observation.
The author notes, “Pumpkin pie and sweet potato pie are not the same thing.”

The author notes that sweet potato pie is different than pumpkin pie.

40. observes – Use when an expert makes an observation.
The author observes, “The black keys on a piano are made from ebony wood. Ebony wood is the
hardest of all woods.”

The author observes that the hardest of all woods, ebony wood, is used to make the black keys on a piano.

41. pleads – Use when an expert urgently wants to make a point.
The author pleads, “If you don’t start smoking cigarettes you’ll never get addicted.”

The author pleads for us not to start smoking, so we won’t ever get addicted.

42. points out – Use when an expert makes an observation.
Soo Kim, the author of the fourth article, points out, “Korean food is healthy and delicious.”

Soo Kim points out that Korean food is not only delicious but good for you, too.

43. professes – Use when an expert wants to make his personal viewpoint or feelings known.
The author professes, “We don’t have to agree with people in order to be nice to them.”

The author professes that we should be nice to people even if they don’t agree with us.

44. presents the argument – Use when an expert wants to persuade us.
Stella Mason presents the argument, “Eating three servings of vegetables and four servings of
fruit each day is one of the healthiest ways to fuel our bodies.”

Stella Mason presents the argument that we should all eat three servings of vegetables and four
servings of fruit each day to keep our bodies healthy.

45. proposes – Use when an expert wants to make a suggestion.
The author proposes, “Students should go on more field trips. There is nothing better than seeing
something in person and getting hands-on experience.”

The author thinks that it is good for kids to see something in person, touch and experience it themselves, so she proposes more field trips.

46. proves – Use when an expert has given proof.
The author proves, “Recent photos have shown for sure that Mars has flowing water.”

The author proves that the planet Mars has flowing water by showing recent photos.

47. questions – Use when an expert raises a question.
Bear Grylls questions, “Who would not want to know basic survival skills? Knowing where to find water, food, and how to make shelter could save your life.”

Bear Grylls questions why anyone wouldn’t want to learn basic survival skills. If we know where to find water, food, and how to make shelter it could save our lives one day.

48. recommends – Use when an expert gives advice.
Dr. Oz recommends, “We need at least 8 glasses of water every day.”

Dr. Oz recommends for us to drink at least 8 glasses of water every day.

49. rejects – Use when an expert rejects an idea.
The author rejects the idea that wild animals are better off in a zoo. “No one can convince me that animals thrive in a zoo environment. They are meant to be in the wild, and that’s where they are  happiest.”

The author rejects the idea that wild animals should be in a zoo. She thinks they are better off in the wild where they can be happy.

50. relates – Use when an expert tells us something.
Jon Surmayo relates, “When I was a boy, I played outdoors every single day. I climbed trees, built forts, and swam in the creek with my friends.”

Jon Surmayo relates that when he was a kid, he climbed trees, built forts, and swam in the creek
with his friends. He played outdoors every day.

51. remarks – Use when an expert tells us something.
The author, Jean-Pierre Conte, remarks, “Come visit the island of Haiti, and you’ll fall in love with the people. They are warm and loving.”

Jean-Pierre Conte remarks how great it would be for tourists to come visit Haiti because the people are warm and loving.

52. reminds us – Use when an expert wants us to remember something.
André Rieu, the famous orchestra leader, reminds us, “Music is the international language.”

The orchestra leader André Rieu reminds us that music is the international language.

53. repeats – Use when an expert repeats or restates an important idea.
The jungle expert Sara Gilson repeats, “I can’t say it enough: if you are bitten by a snake, seek
medical attention right away.”

Jungle expert Sara Gilson repeats her advice that we should seek immediate medical attention if
we are bitten by a snake.

54. reports – Use when an expert shares firsthand information.
The Weather Channel reports, “There is a category three hurricane headed for New Orleans.”

The Weather Channel reports a category three hurricane is headed for New Orleans.

55. reveals – Use when an expert shares information for the first time.
Stacy Doria, our drama teacher, reveals, “Our next show will be West Side Story.”

Our drama teacher revealed West Side Story will be our next show.

56. says – Use to quote an expert.
Mickey Mouse says, “Meeska, Mooshka, Mickey Mouse!” to open Mickey’s Clubhouse.

To open Mickey’s Clubhouse, Mickey Mouse says special magic words.

57. states – Use to quote an expert.                                                                                                    Melissa Forney states, “The three most important things to remember in writing are content,
creativity, and conventions.”

Melissa Forney states that content, creativity, and conventions are the three most important things to remember in writing.

58. stresses – Use when an expert thinks something is important.
Maya Angelou stresses, “If you don’t like something, change it. If you can’t change it, change your attitude. Don’t complain.”

Maya Angelou stresses that we should not complain. If we don’t like something, we should change it. If we can’t change it, then we have to change our attitude.

59. suggests – Use to quote an expert.
Alma Runningbear suggests, “If you’re going to make your own pemmican, use sweet, fresh berries that have been dried for a week. Chokeberries are a good choice.”

Alma Runningbear suggests to use sweet, fresh chokeberries that have been dried for a week if you’re going to make your own pemmican.

60. testifies – Use when an expert shares from firsthand experience.
The author testifies, “I have seen the Statue of Liberty up close, and she is one gorgeous beauty.”

The author testifies that he has seen the Statue of Liberty in person, and he thinks it’s beautiful.

61. thinks – Use to quote an expert’s personal opinion.
Fen Chen, the author, thinks, “Chinese food in America is very different from Chinese food
in Taiwan.”

The author, Fen Chen, thinks the Chinese food here in America is very different from the Chinese food in Taiwan.

62. urges – Use when an expert wants to emphasize something or move us to action.
Our coach urges, “Stay active every day. Exercise is great for the body.”

Coach urges us to exercise every day because it is excellent for your body.

63. wants us to know – Use when an expert has given advice.
Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson wants us to know, “One of the most important things you can accomplish is just being yourself.”

Dwayne Johnson, also known as “The Rock,” wants us to know that it is important to just be yourself.

64. warns us – Use when an expert wants to caution us.
The author of Getting Your Driver’s License warns us, “Don’t wait until the last minute to study for the written test. That test is as important as the driving test.”

The author of Getting Your Driver’s License warns us to study for the written test and not put it
off till the last minute. You can’t take your driving test if you don’t pass the written test.