All Learners: Unit 1 – Citizenship and Different Forms of Government (August/September)

TeacherStacy Gregorski
Subject AreaCivics
Grade Level7th Grade
Week #August/September
Unit of InstructionCitizenship and Different Forms of Government
Standard(s) Taught

Curriculum Standards

Benchmarks

**Define the term “citizen,” and identify legal means of becoming a United States citizen.

SS.7.C.2.1

**Evaluate the obligations citizens have to obey laws, pay taxes, defend the nation, and serve on juries. 

SS.7.C.2.2

Locate major cultural landmarks that are emblematic of the United States.

SS.7.G.2.1

****Compare different forms of government (direct democracy, representative democracy, socialism, communism, monarchy, oligarchy, autocracy).

SS.7.C.3.1

****Compare parliamentary, federal, confederal, and unitary systems of governments.

SS.7.C.3.2

Learning Targets and Learning Criteria
  1. Define citizenship as stated in the Fourteenth Amendment.
  2. Explain how a person can become a citizen of the United States.
  3. Recognize the concept of common good as a rationale for fulfilling the obligations and/or responsibilities of citizenship.
  4. Use scenarios to assess specific obligations and/or responsibilities of citizens as they relate to active participation in society and government.
  5. Distinguish between obligations, responsibilities, and duties.
  6. Examine the significant contributions of citizens to a democratic society.
  7. Analyze scenarios describing various forms of government.
  8. Understand definitions of the various forms of government.
Classroom Activities

Daily Bell Ringer – Students are required to record their answers for daily critical thinking questions in their bell ringer notebooks (either a spiral notebook kept in class or a section kept in a student’s binder).

Daily Instruction – Students are required to participate in daily instruction, which can include PowerPoint presentations, group discussions, think-pair-shares, real-world simulations, formative assignments, and note taking.

Assignments Due

Most work in Civics is done in class, but students are still expected to take home and complete classwork that is incomplete.   Students are also expected to study for all unit summatives.

Additional Resources

iCivics Games

  • Immigration Nation Game
  • Responsibility Launcher Game

Quizlet.com

 Mr. Raymond’s Videos

Other